Amy Schultz

Credentials: PhD, MS

Position title: Epidemiology Data Scientist

Email: aaschultz4@wisc.edu

Phone: 608-890-3724

Amy Schultz's CV
Curriculum Vitae
Amy Schultz' head shot.

Current role

Amy Schultz’s role at the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW) is to facilitate research examining the role various social, behavioral, and environmental determinants may have on people’s health. She supports conceptualization, study design, and statistical analysis of epidemiology and translational research, as well as public health projects. In addition, she supports community engagement, outreach, and data dissemination efforts in under-served communities throughout rural Wisconsin, Madison, and the city of Milwaukee. Dr. Schultz has over 8 years of experience managing, coordinating, and directing population-based research studies, community-based research studies, and public health surveillance and biomonitoring projects with SHOW. Prior to her current role, she’s served as SHOW’s Associate Director, Research Scientist, and Ancillary Studies Manager.

Research interests

Dr. Schultz’s research interests are in understanding how one’s environment shapes their health across their lifespan. Her training is in environmental epidemiology. She uses over a decade of geographical information systems (GIS) expertise to examine spatial and contextual associations between environmental, social, and behavioral factors and health outcomes with a particular focus on health equity and rural health. Her prior research has focused on policy-relevant and translational research examining sources of air pollution and respiratory health outcomes among both adults and children. Her current work focuses on (1) measuring cumulative and longitudinal environmental exposures across the life course, and (2) examining the social, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with aging.

Education

  • University of Illinois, BLAS, geography
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison, MS, Population Health Sciences
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison, PhD, Epidemiology